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ERP Training and Power Users 06/28/2012

Posted by TBoehm30 in Trainiing.
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4 comments

A full ERP implementation project will contain plenty of training.  All the members of the company need to start from scratch to learn the use of the new system.  I’ve scheduled classes where we have 10 days of classes plus three alternates a week or two later for anyone who missed it.  The thing to remember is that is just for the basics; you will spend much more time with the people destined to become your ‘Power Users’.

The main classes that will be scheduled are for beginning 101, learn how to navigate type instruction.  When users logon for the first time, they need an idea of what to expect, how to get what they need and what they are allowed to do.  Everyone will need that class so it will be the biggest or most offered class.

After the beginning class, you will need some specific classes.  The Accounting group will need to go into detail on the accounting screens.  The Manufacturing groups will need specifics on how to run MRP, use Work Orders, order Supplies, etc.  The Customer service group will need to understand Sales Orders, Cases, how to change documents, and update notes.  The point is that these classes will be smaller and need to include only the groups that focus on the topic being taught.

Most project managers and organizers will stop there.  They will teach what is needed and then allow the users to figure out if they need further functionality or further help.  It has been my experience that users don’t know to ask for more.  They will start using the system in the way that they are taught and not try to branch out for better, more efficient processes.  Usually a new employee, or outside consultant will bring in ideas on how to use the software better.  It’s rare that someone just figures out better functionality, communicates the process with their manager and gets the company to adopt the new process.

As I wrote in a previous article, follow-up training is necessary.  Once users become familiar enough with the software, they need a time to go back to ask questions.  They will want the details on why they do what they do.  They need to know how it impacts the company and what the big picture looks like.

That full process will take care of most of your users.  Beyond that, however, are the ‘Power Users’.  These are the people who seriously want to take advantage of the system and use it to the fullest extent possible.  These are the people who currently have massive spreadsheets that they download to understand the data.  They need to understand what is going on at a basic level and make decisions based on that information.

These are the people who will try your patience once the new software is going strong.  They will need one-on-one guidance for their crazy projects.  They will stretch your understanding of the software to its limits and force you to call the vendor.

Now is the time to plan for their training.  They know what they do, and will be able to explain what they need.  You will be able to schedule one class for a bunch of them, or several classes if needed.  Getting them together may even work in your favor, giving them other resources to go to and other further ideas on how to improve the status quo.  You need to be at the top of your game and have good backup support for these classes.  You might want managers included in the room so that if ideas get out of hand, they can be cooled down.

Watch the beginning classes for the people who ask the most questions in the most detail.  Figure out who you think will become your ‘Power Users’ to include in the new classes.  Talk to them in advance to get an idea of what they will need.  Figure out how many of them can go into the same class.

These are the people that will figure out how to drag the last penny of profit out of what you currently have.  They will need data; all they can get, and more if possible.  They will need access to the system; more than the IT department currently provides for them on the standard templates.  They will need instruction on what other departments do, and how that relates to what they do. 

We spend so much time on teaching the basics.  Many classes have to go at the speed of the slowest user.  This won’t allow the best use of the software, and won’t create that immediate ROI that was the biggest reason for the software.  Spend a little more time and attention on the best and the brightest.  They are the ones who will have the biggest return on your investment.  They are the ones who know that it’s a global world and Technology makes it happen.

Comment with your stories of how users stretched the possibilities of your new software and how you had to develop new training to keep up.

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ERP – Follow-up Training 04/27/2012

Posted by TBoehm30 in ERP.
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3 comments

I spent last week in another System Administration class.  There were 9 other people in the class with me.  Most of those 9 had taken the class at the beginning of the project, but now they understand the system so the class actually made sense.

The first time we took the class, it was like drinking from a fire hose.  We saw what the system could do, but there was no possibility that anyone walked away with the ability to fix anything immediately.  We took our notebooks filled with pre-printed material, our extra notes and went home to practice what we learned.   Hopefully, we at least got the big picture.  It would take time to learn the details.

I had taken the class previously as well.  Since I have been heavily involved in the technical issues of this project, I knew most of what we talked about during this round.  I was only there to make sure that when we talked about something that was customized, or company specific, I could lead the discussion.   Several times, I had to interrupt to say that this subject didn’t apply to us, or explain how we had already implemented a particular feature.

During the 4 day class, we covered numerous topics.  Every now and then I would glance around the room to notice how much people were paying attention.  The class was usually divided in their attention since they are the entire technical team for a company covering 4 states.  I expected some division of attention while they had to attend to other duties.

Some topics were easier to understand than others, and some people had more practical experience with some topics.  I hoped that, like me, people were paying extra attention to the few topics that they did not understand completely.  I also hoped that they listened carefully to any topics that seemed new to them.

I walked away from the class with new ideas on how to use the system to improve the flow of information at my client.  For example, the ERP system we work with has a statistical module for storing data over time.  I had created a few dashboards using real-time data, but now I can use the statistical data to show those same dashboards over time.

This is the training model that needs to be followed for a successful ERP implementation.  Like a good presentation, people need to be told what they are going to hear, then they need to hear it, then they should be told what they just heard.  The plan for a new ERP system should include a plenty of training for all users of the system.  They need at least two official training sessions.  The first one gives them the overview of what they will need to learn.  The second one goes over the same material, but this time the users understand the details.

Between the two training classes, people will need to practice with the new system.  Some of them will design and document the new procedures.  A few users will test out the limits of the system by pushing every button, clicking every link, and choosing every option.  Some of them will go back and not think about the new software until the next class.  Obviously, a good implementation plan will optimize the probability of users going back to practice with the new software.

A third class might also be a good idea to plan.  At some point in the future, users will want to see what else they can do.  They will want to go to a new phase where they wring out every improvement possible.  A class scheduled for a year after go-live is a good time for that one.  Users will have a very good idea of what they are doing, some small ideas for what they want to do, and a big appetite for new possibilities.

The good ones go like that because it’s a global world and Technology makes it happen.