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How close is your software vendor? 10/12/2011

Posted by TBoehm30 in Software.
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The other day I had a software problem.  My client had come to me with an issue and I had to come up with a solution.  I have been working with them for a while so I know their software pretty well.  I can usually figure out their problems and either solve them or come up with a workaround.  At the very least I can use their testing environment to document all the steps to recreate the problem as well as the steps taken to try to solve it.

My client has a valid contract with the software vendor and has full access to their help desk.  I am sure you have dealt with many ‘help’ desks and are completely familiar with what that means.  Some of them are very good and some of them are worse than a hot day in the desert.  I have to admit that this one is actually pretty good.

The trick is in the communication.  The people who I work with can’t always communicate their problems in such a way that the help desk can solve them.  They also have trouble understanding the responses.  Sometimes the tech-speak is just too complicated.  That’s where I come in.  I can help translate for both sides to get the problem solved.

Today, I found what I thought was a bug in the software.  The company that created this software is very sensitive about criticism of their programs.  I didn’t want to go to the help desk with this one until I had verified functionality with one of their senior consultants.  Since I am on good terms with several of them, my options were open.

The project manager for our implementation likes for me to go through him before talking to the consultants.  I shot him an email with my problem.  Within a few hours he had confirmed my problem, sent it off to tech support, and came back with a solution.  It wasn’t really a bug, but a setup problem.

I have dealt with many software companies throughout my career.  I have talked to people who were really good at their job, but the company was terrible; and I have talked to people who couldn’t help a cat out of a bag, even when their company was great.  A response within a few hours with a solution, going around the help desk, is above average support.  I would recommend that any day of the week.

When you are looking for software it is important to determine what kind of relationships they develop with their clients.  Sure, you will get references and talk to them about the pros and cons about the software; but you also need to find out about their responsiveness.  You need to find out about their personnel.  Do they stay in touch with their clients?  Do they come back to find out if there are any lingering issues?

Before you make a decision on your software, find out who your main contact will be.  Try to meet with him or her at a time and place where you have plenty of time for questions.  This person needs to be someone with whom you can trust and build a relationship.  They need to listen; you need to feel like they are listening to you and not thinking about what they will say next.  They need to be flexible.  Throw them a hypothetical curve ball; how do they react?

If this person doesn’t meet your criteria, don’t abandon the software vendor entirely, just ask for someone else.  Most companies would be happy to switch personnel if it means a chance for a sale.  Make sure you still have time to repeat the process with someone new.

My criteria is for someone who understands that it’s a global world out there and Technology makes it happen.

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