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Test Before Installing an Upgrade 10/29/2010

Posted by TBoehm30 in Software.
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A new risk to your software is coming; it is time for an upgrade.  Remember when your system was new?  Remember that huge project to implement the software?  Now, it seems, you don’t know how you survived without it.  Don’t take unnecessary risks; make sure you are prepared for this upgrade.

An upgrade may just be a small change, it could be a large change, it could be a few patches, it could be a brand new user interface, and it could contain brand new modules.  No matter the size, you want to make sure that this upgrade doesn’t break any critical processes before you install it.  Even if you get experts to put it in, you will want to do some testing first.

There are several ways of getting an upgrade installed.  You can get the software company to do it for you.  This can be included in your support contract, or you might pay extra for it.  You could hire a consultant who is an expert on the software you are using.  If you are going this route it is best when you have a working relationship with the consultants so that they understand your business as well as the specific software.  You can also do it yourself.  Many software companies provide instructions for how to put in the new code.

The first step, however, is always going to be testing.  A good software company will test the upgrades themselves.  The reason you pay money for the software support is so that you can trust the software will do what it is supposed to.  If the software doesn’t do what you want, you can call the company for help.  A good consultant will schedule in plenty of testing before an upgrade.  They should know what the upgrade is meant to improve, and with a good understanding of your company, should know what to test.  Of course, if you do this yourself, then testing should be second nature.

There are several areas to test before upgrading.  Any customization to the software should be at the top of the list.  Since you changed the default behavior of the program, you hope that the underlying logic didn’t change.  If it did, you will need to either remove your customization, or re-create the custom code on the new version of the software.

The next areas to test require a little bit of study.  Usually the software company will publish documentation on the changes.  You should review those changes and mark any functionality that is critical.  Sometimes the documentation can be technical and confusing; if that is the case, simply write down the module, area, functionality, or process that needs to be tested. 

Last on the list of testing is any other area you think should be tested before an upgrade.  I have seen people just do a full validation before any upgrade. 

During the implementation phase for this software, you documented your business processes.  Hopefully, you had a documented test script.  Save those!  If you have good test scripts, they can be used again for this process.  If you don’t have test scripts, then make them now and you can use them for each upgrade.  Spend some time on those scripts, they are valuable.  If you have a good set of test scripts, then you understand your system; you have the ability to validate your system and your data.

Make a list of all the functionalities that are important to you.  Start out with broad categories such as A/P, A/R, Manufacturing, or CRM.  Then narrow the focus to specifics such as returning merchandise, or receiving a complaint from a customer.  If you document the steps you take for each of these specifics, and make screen shots of the results, you are on your way to a great set of test scripts.

Before letting anyone upgrade your software system, make sure you back up all of your data.  Make sure you can restore yourself to the previous version in case catastrophe strikes. 

If you have properly tested the new software, then you shouldn’t run into any surprises.  Remember, it’s a global world out there and Technology makes it happen.

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